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What Is An SA107 Form?

The SA107 form is a supplementary UK tax document used for reporting income received from trusts, settlements, or estates of deceased persons as part of an individual's self-assessment tax return.


What Is An SA107 Form


Understanding the SA107 Form in the UK (2023 - 2024)

The SA107 form is a crucial document for specific taxpayers in the United Kingdom, particularly those involved with trusts, settlements, or estates of deceased persons. This form serves as a supplementary tax form for reporting income received from these sources.


The Purpose of SA107

The primary purpose of the SA107 form is to declare income that taxpayers receive from trusts, settlements, or the estates of deceased persons. This form is integral to the UK's Self Assessment tax system, ensuring transparency and compliance in reporting such income.


Who Needs to File the SA107?

The SA107 form is necessary for individuals who fall into specific categories related to trusts and estates:

  • Beneficiaries of Trusts or Settlements: If you are a beneficiary and have received or are entitled to income from a trust or settlement (excluding bare trusts), you are required to fill out the SA107.

  • Settlors: Those who have put money or assets into a trust or settlement must report this on the SA107 form.

  • Income from Estates: If you have received income from the estate of a person who has passed away, it is mandatory to declare this income using the SA107.

  • Trustees and Settlor-Interested Trusts: If you are taxable on income arising to trustees of a settlor-interested trust or another settlement in which you have an interest, you need to use the SA107.

  • Income to Minor Children from Settlements: Parents or guardians who are taxable on income payable to their minor children from property placed in settlement must also use the SA107 form​​​​.



How to Access and Complete the SA107 Form

The SA107 form can be obtained from the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) website. It is essential for individuals who regularly file a Self Assessment tax return, as HMRC might also send it to them. Filling in the form requires attention to detail, especially since different types of income (Trust Income, Settlor, or Estate Income) may require additional forms like the R185. Detailed guidelines for each line item of the SA107 are also available on the HMRC website, assisting taxpayers in accurately completing the form​​.


Key Sections of the SA107 Form

While I wasn't able to access detailed instructions for each line item of the SA107 form, it's important to carefully follow the HMRC's guidelines available on their website. The form is structured to capture specific information about income from trusts, settlements, or deceased persons' estates. It's crucial to provide accurate and comprehensive details in each section to ensure compliance and avoid any potential issues with HMRC.


Filing the SA107 Form

If you are submitting your tax return on paper, the SA107 form is a required part of your submission. It should be filled out with care and attached to the SA100 tax return form. For those filing online, the SA107 form is not required; the online system will automatically present the relevant sections based on the details you provide. This makes the process simpler and more streamlined, ensuring that only the necessary information is provided​​.


How to Fill Different Sections of the SA107 Form

The SA107 form is used for reporting income from trusts, settlements, and estates of deceased persons. Here's a breakdown of how to fill in different sections:


Discretionary Income Payment from a UK Resident Trust:

  • Box 1: Enter the net amount of income after tax taken off.

  • Box 2: For income from settlor-interested trusts, list total payments received.


Non-Discretionary Income Entitlement from a Trust:

  • Box 3: Enter the net amount of non-savings income after tax.

  • Box 4: List the net amount of savings income after tax.

  • Box 5: Input the net amount of dividend income after tax.


Income Chargeable on Settlors:

  • Boxes 7 to 12: Enter the respective net amounts of non-savings, savings, and dividend income, each taxed at the basic or trust rate, after tax is taken off.


Income from the Estates of Deceased Persons:

  • Box 16: Include non-savings income after tax, such as rental income or trade profits.

  • Box 17: Enter savings income after tax, like bank interest.

  • Box 18: Input dividend income after tax; include dividends from UK and foreign companies.

  • Box 18.1: For dividend income taxed at 7.5%, list the amount after tax.

  • Box 19: Enter non-savings income taxed at non-repayable basic rate, including life insurance policy gains.


Income from Foreign Estates:

  • Box 22: State foreign estate income.

  • Box 23: Note any relief for UK tax already accounted for.


Foreign Tax Paid on Estate Income:

  • Box 24: List foreign tax for which Foreign Tax Credit Relief has not been claimed.


Residential Property Income:

  • Box 25: Enter the amount of residential property income or restricted finance costs from trusts and estates.

  • Box 25.1: Mention unused residential property finance costs brought forward.


Any Other Information:

  • Box 26: Provide any other relevant information here.


Suggested Answers:

  • For boxes 1, 3, 4, 5, 7-12, 16-19, 22, 24, 25, and 25.1, the amounts will vary based on individual circumstances. Enter the exact figures as per your financial records.

  • For Box 18 and 18.1, ensure dividend income is correctly classified and taxed.

  • In Box 26, include any additional details that might be relevant, such as explanations for unusual income patterns or large one-time income amounts.


How to Fill Different Sections of the SA107 Form


Submission of the SA107 Form

The SA107 form is to be submitted alongside the SA100 tax return. It's important to note that if you are filing your tax return online, the SA107 form is not required. Online filing automatically provides the sections you need to fill out based on the details you provide. However, if you choose to submit your tax return on paper, then the SA107 form becomes a necessary part of your submission​​​​​​.


Tips for Completing the SA107 Form

  1. Accurate Information: Ensure that all the information you provide is accurate and up-to-date. Double-check figures and details to avoid any errors.

  2. Understand the Sections: Familiarize yourself with the different sections of the form and what they are meant to capture. This understanding will help you provide the right information in the right section.

  3. Seek Help if Needed: If you are unsure about any aspect of the form, consider seeking advice from a tax professional or the HMRC.


Updates and Changes for 2023 - 2024

For the tax year 2022 to 2023, there have been updates in the SA107 form, especially in how to complete certain boxes like box 18. These updates reflect the evolving nature of tax regulations and the need for taxpayers to stay informed about the latest requirements. The latest version of the form and its notes have been made available, replacing previous versions from 2019​​​​.


Common Pitfalls and Additional Resources

In the previous sections, we covered the basics of the SA107 form, including its purpose, who needs to file it, and detailed guidance on completing it. This final section will address common pitfalls to avoid when filling out the SA107 form and additional resources available for UK taxpayers for the tax year 2023 - 2024.


Common Pitfalls to Avoid

  1. Incorrect or Incomplete Information: One of the most common mistakes is providing incorrect or incomplete information. Ensure that every detail, especially figures and personal information, is accurate.

  2. Missing Deadlines: The SA107 form, if submitted on paper, should be sent to HMRC by October 31st following the end of the tax year. Missing this deadline can lead to penalties.

  3. Not Using Updated Forms: Always use the most current version of the SA107 form. For the tax year 2023 - 2024, make sure to use the updated form available on the HMRC website.

  4. Overlooking Additional Forms: Depending on the source of your income (Trust Income, Settlor, or Estate Income), you may need additional forms like the R185. Don’t forget to include these if they are applicable​​.


Additional Resources

  • HMRC Website: The HMRC website is the primary resource for accessing the SA107 form and its accompanying guidelines. It provides the most up-to-date information and forms.

  • Tax Advisors and Accountants: Consulting with tax professionals can provide personalized assistance, especially for complex situations or if you are unsure about any aspect of the form.

  • Tax Software: Online tax software can simplify the filing process, especially if you are filing online. These platforms often guide you through the necessary sections and can help avoid common errors​​.



Most Important FAQs about the SA107 Form (UK)


1. Q: What is the SA107 form used for?

A: The SA107 form is used for reporting income received from trusts, settlements, or estates of deceased persons in the UK.


2. Q: Who needs to fill out the SA107 form?

A: Beneficiaries of trusts or settlements, settlors who put assets into a trust, individuals receiving income from an estate of a deceased person, and those taxable on income from settlor-interested trusts or settlements.


3. Q: How do I obtain the SA107 form?

A: The SA107 form can be downloaded from the HMRC website or may be sent to you if you regularly file a Self Assessment tax return.


4. Q: Can I submit the SA107 form online?

A: If you file your tax return online, the relevant sections of the SA107 form will be presented automatically. The separate form is required only for paper submissions.


5. Q: What is the deadline for submitting the SA107 form?

A: The deadline for paper submissions, including the SA107 form, is October 31st following the end of the tax year.


6. Q: Is there a penalty for late submission of the SA107 form?

A: Yes, late submission of the SA107 form can result in penalties from HMRC.


7. Q: What information do I need to complete the SA107 form?

A: You will need details of the income received from trusts, settlements, or estates, including amounts and sources.


8. Q: Do I need to report income from foreign trusts on the SA107 form?

A: Yes, income from foreign trusts that is taxable in the UK should be reported on the SA107 form.


9. Q: What should I do if I'm unsure about how to fill a section of the SA107 form?

A: Seek advice from a tax professional or consult HMRC's guidelines if you are unsure about any aspect of the form.


10. Q: Can I amend a submitted SA107 form?

A: Yes, if you need to make changes after submission, you can amend the form. The process depends on whether you filed online or on paper.


11. Q: Do I need to fill out an SA107 form if I am a trustee?

A: As a trustee, you may need to fill out the SA107 form if you received income that is taxable under your name.


12. Q: What is the difference between discretionary and non-discretionary income on the SA107 form?

A: Discretionary income is where the trustee decides who gets what amount, whereas non-discretionary income is where the beneficiary's entitlement is fixed.


13. Q: How do I declare dividend income on the SA107 form?

A: Dividend income should be declared in the relevant section of the form, including the amount after tax.


14. Q: Is the SA107 form different each tax year?

A: The form may be updated annually, so it's important to use the version specific to the tax year you are reporting.


15. Q: Do I need to attach other documents with the SA107 form?

A: Depending on your situation, additional forms like R185 might be required along with the SA107.


16. Q: How do I report income from an estate where I am a beneficiary?

A: Report this income in the specific section for estate income, detailing the amount received after tax.


17. Q: Can I use tax software to help fill out the SA107 form?

A: Yes, many online tax software programs can assist in filling out the SA107 form, especially for online submissions.


18. Q: What if I receive income from a trust in which I am also the settlor?

A: This situation should be declared in the settlor section of the SA107 form, detailing the income received.


19. Q: How do I report income from a bare trust on the SA107 form?

A: Income from bare trusts is typically not reported on the SA107 form, as the beneficiary is usually taxed directly.


20. Q: Can I file the SA107 form separately from the SA100 tax return?

A: No, the SA107 form is a supplementary form and must be submitted alongside the SA100 tax return.



How a Tax Accountant Can Help You with SA 107 Form


How a Tax Accountant Can Help You with SA 107 Form

When it comes to navigating the complexities of tax forms like the SA107 in the UK, the role of a tax accountant cannot be overstated. This form, used for reporting income from trusts, settlements, or estates of deceased persons, requires a nuanced understanding of tax laws and meticulous attention to detail. A tax accountant's expertise in these areas can be invaluable for individuals who need to file this form.


In-Depth Understanding of Tax Regulations

A tax accountant's primary asset is their comprehensive knowledge of tax regulations. The SA107 form, like many tax documents, is subject to intricate rules and exceptions. Tax accountants stay updated on the latest changes in tax legislation, ensuring that the information they provide is current and accurate. This expertise is crucial in navigating the specifics of the SA107 form, such as determining the type of income to report and understanding the nuances of different sections.


Accurate and Efficient Form Completion

Filling out the SA107 form can be a daunting task due to its complexity. A tax accountant can assist in accurately completing each section of the form. They can help in categorizing income correctly, whether it's from a discretionary or non-discretionary trust, or from the estate of a deceased person. Their ability to interpret tax law ensures that all relevant income is reported correctly, minimizing the risk of errors that could lead to penalties or additional scrutiny from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC).


Minimizing Tax Liability

One of the key benefits of consulting a tax accountant is their ability to identify opportunities for minimizing tax liability legally. They can advise on the most tax-efficient way to report income, taking advantage of any applicable reliefs or exemptions. This advice is particularly beneficial for individuals who receive income from multiple sources, as a tax accountant can provide strategies to reduce the overall tax burden.


Handling Complex Situations

The SA107 form is often required in complex tax situations, such as when dealing with the estates of deceased persons or trusts with multiple beneficiaries. A tax accountant can provide clarity and guidance in these situations, ensuring that the form is filled out correctly. They can also offer advice on how to handle any unusual income patterns or large one-time amounts, which might otherwise raise red flags with HMRC.


Assistance with Online Filing

For those who choose to file their tax return online, a tax accountant can assist in navigating the online filing system. While the SA107 form is integrated into the online Self Assessment process, the guidance of a tax accountant can still be invaluable in ensuring that all relevant sections are completed correctly. They can also help in organizing and uploading the necessary supporting documents.


Dealing with HMRC Inquiries

Should HMRC have any inquiries or require additional information regarding the SA107 form, a tax accountant can act as an intermediary. They can handle correspondence with HMRC, provide additional documentation if needed, and offer representation in more complex disputes or audits. This support can be especially reassuring for individuals who might feel overwhelmed by direct interactions with tax authorities.


Time and Stress Reduction

Dealing with tax matters can be time-consuming and stressful, particularly for those who are not familiar with tax forms and regulations. A tax accountant takes on the burden of completing and submitting the SA107 form, saving time and reducing stress. This allows individuals to focus on their personal or professional lives without the worry of tax-related issues.


Tailored Advice and Planning

Finally, a tax accountant can provide tailored advice and planning beyond just filling out the SA107 form. They can help in long-term tax planning, especially for those who regularly receive income from trusts or estates. This holistic approach ensures that individuals are not only compliant with tax laws but also making informed decisions that benefit their overall financial health.



In conclusion, a tax accountant's role in assisting with the SA107 form is multifaceted. They provide not only the technical expertise needed for accurate and compliant filing but also offer strategic advice to minimize tax liability and handle any complexities that may arise. For anyone dealing with the SA107 form, the support of a qualified tax accountant can be an invaluable asset.


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