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What is P14 Form | What are RTI and FPS


Understanding the HMRC P14 Form

The HMRC P14 form is a crucial document in the UK tax system. It is a return for an individual taxpayer, used by employers to report the pay and tax details of their employees to the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The form was replaced by the year-end Full Payment Submission (FPS) and Employer Payment Summary (EPS) with the introduction of Real Time Information (RTI).


Understanding the HMRC P14 Form


What Does the P14 Form Include?

The P14 form includes comprehensive details about an employee's income and deductions for the tax year. It shows the name and address of the employer, the tax office name, number and reference, and the tax year. It also includes the employee's personal details, such as name, private address, date of birth, and national insurance number.


The form further details the National Insurance Contributions (NIC) paid by both the employer and the employee, the scheme contracted-out number (if applicable), and the NIC rebate. It also includes information about statutory adoption pay, maternity pay, paternity pay, and sick pay, as well as the employee's widows and orphans life assurance contributions.


The P14 form also provides a breakdown of the employee's pay and income tax details, distinguishing between any previous and current employment, and the total for the year. It also includes the final tax code and the date of starting and/or leaving, if appropriate.


Submission of the P14 Form

An employer must complete a P14 form for each employee where they were required to complete a P11 deductions working sheet during the year. This form must be submitted to the Processing Office with form P35 (for years up to 2004 and for all paper-only returns for all years) by 19 May following the end of the income tax year to which it relates.


For instance, the P14 form for the 2010-11 tax year must be held by the Processing Office on or before 19 May 2011. The employer is responsible for separating each part of the form and submitting it appropriately.


HMRC's Approach to P14 Discrepancies

HMRC sends out one to many (OTM) letters to taxpayers and agents to encourage them to investigate potential discrepancies in their P14 forms and work with HMRC to resolve these issues. These letters are not an official compliance check or a notice of investigation, but they do advise the recipient to check the figures provided to HMRC for discrepancies and take steps to correct them.


If discrepancies are found, it's advised to contact the payroll department(s) of the employer(s) they have worked for. This may identify discrepancies that can be resolved for future years. If after all investigations are completed, and the conclusion is no amendments are required, contact with HMRC would be beneficial to ensure no investigations are escalated from their end.


In conclusion, the P14 form is a vital part of the UK tax system, providing a detailed record of an employee's income and deductions for a tax year. It's essential for employers to complete and submit this form accurately to avoid potential discrepancies and subsequent investigations by HMRC.



Filling Out the HMRC P14 Form: A Step-by-Step Guide

The HMRC P14 form is a crucial document used by employers to report the pay and tax details of their employees to the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). This guide will walk you through the process of filling out the different sections of the HMRC P14 form.


Employer and Employee Details

At the top of the form, you'll need to provide your name and address as the employer. You'll also need to fill in the employee's details, including their first two forenames, surname, National Insurance number, and works/payroll number. You'll also need to provide the employee's private address, gender, and date of birth.


Tax and National Insurance Contributions (NIC) Details

Next, you'll need to fill in the details of the tax deducted and the NICs. This includes the tax deducted in the previous employment(s), in the current employment, and the total for the year. You'll also need to provide the final tax code and the dates of starting and/or leaving, if applicable.


For the NICs, you'll need to provide the NICs table letter and details of the employee's contributions due on all earnings above the Primary Threshold (PT). You'll also need to provide details of the earnings at the Lower Earnings Limit (LEL), earnings above the LEL up to and including the PT, earnings above the PT up to and including the Upper Accrual Point (UAP), and earnings above the UAP up to and including the Upper Earnings Limit (UEL).


Statutory Payments and Student Loan Deductions

In the next section, you'll need to provide details of any statutory payments included in the pay 'In this employment' figure. This includes Statutory Adoption Pay (SAP), Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP), Ordinary Statutory Paternity Pay (OSPP), Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP), and Statutory Sick Pay (SSP). You'll also need to provide details of any Student Loan deductions.


Pay and Income Tax Details

In the final section, you'll need to provide details of the pay and income tax. This includes the pay in the previous employment(s), in the current employment, and the total for the year. If there was a payment in Week 53, you'll need to indicate this. If there was a net refund, you'll need to enter 'R' in the appropriate box.


Certificate by Employer/Paying Office

At the end of the form, there's a section titled 'Certificate by Employer/Paying Office'. This section confirms that the form shows the total pay for Income Tax purposes in this employment for the year. It also confirms that any overtime, bonus, commission, etc., Statutory Sick Pay, Statutory Maternity Pay, Ordinary Statutory Paternity Pay, Additional Statutory Paternity Pay, and Statutory Adoption Pay is included.


In conclusion, filling out the HMRC P14 form requires careful attention to detail to ensure all the necessary information is accurately provided. By following this guide, you should be able to complete the form with confidence.


Understanding Substitute Forms P14 and Its Application in Various Schemes

The HMRC P14 form is a crucial document in the UK tax system. It is a return for an individual taxpayer, used by employers to report the pay and tax details of their employees to the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). However, there are instances where employers might need to use a substitute form P14. This article will delve into the concept of Substitute Forms P14 and the various schemes for which the HMRC P14 form is used.


What is a Substitute Form P14?

A Substitute Form P14 is an alternative to the standard P14 form that employers can use under certain circumstances. If an employer wishes to use a substitute form P14, they must request approval from HMRC. To aid employers in this process, HMRC provides a booklet titled 'RD1 Specification for Employer’s PAYE End of Year Substitute Forms P14 & P60', which contains information about the designs of substitute forms P14 and P60. This publication can be downloaded from the HMRC website.


Once an employer has prepared a specimen of the substitute form they intend to use, they must forward it to their local Processing Office or to HMRC's Customer Information Delivery Team. The specimen is then checked against a list of centrally approved substitute forms. If the form is listed, the employer may use it when submitting their return. If it is not listed, the specimen is submitted to HMRC's Communications and Marketing Customer Information Delivery for further review.


Schemes for Which the HMRC P14 Form is Used

The P14 form can be used for a variety of scheme types. These include:

  • DCNI: Direct Collection National Insurance

  • DOME: Domestic Employment

  • DPGEN: Direct Payment General

  • DPNI: Direct Payment National Insurance

  • EPA: Employer Pension Administration

  • EXAM: Examination Payments

  • NI: National Insurance

  • OCPN: Occupational Pension

  • P: Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

  • PSC: Personal Service Company

  • PSS: Public Service Scheme

  • SICK: Statutory Sick Pay

  • TRONC: Tronc Scheme (for distributing tips in the hospitality industry)

For each of these schemes, an employer must complete a P14 form for each employee where they were required to complete a P11 deductions working sheet during the year. This form must be submitted to the Processing Office by 19 May following the end of the income tax year to which it relates.


In conclusion, the Substitute Form P14 provides an alternative for employers who need to submit a P14 form but require a different format for their specific circumstances. The P14 form itself is a versatile document used across a wide range of schemes, making it a vital part of the UK tax system.



The Evolution of Payroll Reporting in the UK: From HMRC P14 Form to Full Payment Submission (FPS)

The UK tax system has seen significant changes over the years, particularly in the way employers report their employees' pay and tax details to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). We will explore whether the HMRC P14 form is still in use and provide an overview of the Full Payment Submission (FPS), which has become a cornerstone of payroll reporting in the UK.


The HMRC P14 Form: A Thing of the Past?

The HMRC P14 form was an end-of-year summary completed for each employee who earned the Lower Earning Limit or above. It was a crucial document that allowed employers to report the pay and tax details of their employees to HMRC. However, the P14 form has since been replaced by the Employer Payment Summary (EPS) and the Full Payment Submission (FPS) as part of the Real Time Information (RTI) system introduced by HMRC.


The Advent of Real Time Information (RTI)

The RTI system was introduced to improve the efficiency and accuracy of payroll reporting. Under this system, employers are required to report pay and deductions made to employees in real-time, i.e., at the time they are paid, rather than at the end of the tax year. This real-time reporting is done through the Full Payment Submission (FPS).


Understanding the Full Payment Submission (FPS)

The Full Payment Submission (FPS) is a report sent to HMRC about payments and deductions made to employees every time they are paid. All workers paid, even if they get less than £120 a week or are only paid for a short period of time, need to be included if you are running a PAYE scheme. In short FPS is a document that informs HMRC of the employees’ details, pay, and deductions. It includes personal information for each employee on your payroll, including their full name, address, National Insurance Number, and tax code. It also includes the salaries of each employee and the net salary being paid out to them. Furthermore, it provides information about how much income tax, and National Insurance comes off of each employee's payslip, and also what the employer owes in total to HMRC.


The FPS needs to be sent on or before the contractual payment day. Failure to do so can lead to penalties from HMRC. If you pay employees earlier than the contractual pay date, for example, employees are paid on the 25th of the month, but the 25th falls on a Saturday, and you pay the employees on the Friday, you must send the FPS by 11.59pm on Friday 24th. The pay date remains the same for the FPS but HMRC should receive the FPS on or before the date you have paid the employee.


The FPS includes information such as new employees, employees leaving, start of paying a workplace pension, last report of the year, and an employee changing their address. If any errors are found in your FPS, a corrected FPS should be sent as soon as possible.


Key Information Included in an FPS

An FPS provides HMRC with detailed information to ensure that employers and employees are paying the correct amount of tax. The FPS includes the following information:

  • Personal information for each employee on your payroll, including their full name, address, National Insurance Number, and tax code.

  • The salaries of each employee and the net salary being paid out to them.

  • Information about how much income tax, and National Insurance comes off of each employee's payslip, and also what the employer owes in total to HMRC.

  • Information if a new employee has joined the company, or if a previous employee has left.


The Impact of FPS on Payroll Reporting

The introduction of the FPS has revolutionised payroll reporting in the UK. It has made the process more efficient and accurate, ensuring that HMRC has up-to-date information on employees' pay and tax details. This has also helped to reduce errors and discrepancies, making it easier for employers to stay compliant with tax laws.

In conclusion, while the HMRC P14 form played a significant role in payroll reporting in the past, it is no longer in use. It has been replaced by the FPS, which has become an integral part of the RTI system. By understanding how the FPS works, employers can ensure they meet their payroll reporting obligations and stay compliant with UK tax laws.


A Guide on Submitting Full Payment Submission (FPS) in the UK

The Full Payment Submission (FPS), as explain above, is a crucial part of the payroll process in the UK. It is a document that employers need to submit to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) every time they pay their employees. This article will guide you through the process of submitting an FPS.


When to Submit an FPS

You must submit the FPS on or before the date that you issue the payment to your employees. If you submit the FPS after the payment date, you may be required to pay a late fee. However, you can submit your FPS early if needed.


How to Submit an FPS

To submit an FPS, you will need to use your payroll software. The software will show HMRC the pay and deductions you issued during that pay cycle. The FPS should include information on all employees, even if they are under the threshold for tax and NI contributions.


Here are the steps to submit an FPS:

  1. Prepare the FPS: The FPS contains starter and leaver information, employee information such as name, address, NI number and tax code, employee payment and deduction information, and tax, NI and student loan contributions.

  2. Submit the FPS: To submit an FPS, follow your payroll software’s instructions. You must enter your PAYE reference and Accounts Office reference in your software. HMRC will have sent this to you after you registered as an employer.

  3. Check the Submission: After you’ve sent your FPS, you should check if the submission was successful. You can do this by logging into your HMRC online account.

  4. Correct Errors if Any: If you find any errors in your FPS, send a corrected FPS as soon as possible. You need to report more information on an FPS if it includes a new employee, an employee leaves, it’s the last report of the tax year, or you start paying someone a workplace pension.



A Detailed Guide on Completing Different Sections of Full Payment Submission (FPS)

The Full Payment Submission (FPS) is a crucial part of the payroll process in the UK. It is a document that employers need to submit to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) every time they pay their employees. This article will guide you through the process of completing different sections of an FPS.


New Employees

When an employee starts working for you, register them with HMRC by including this information in your FPS the first time you pay them. The fields to be filled include:

  • Start date: Only fill this in the first time you pay a new employee.

  • Starter declaration: Put the starter declaration that you’ve worked out. Do not put anything for new pensioners, or employees seconded from abroad.

  • Student Loan indicator: Put ‘Yes’ if your employee needs you to make Student Loan deductions.

  • Address: Include the employee's address.

  • UK postcode: Include the employee's UK postcode.

  • Foreign country: Only put their country of residence if they live outside the UK, Channel Islands or Isle of Man.

  • Passport number: Include this if you reviewed your employee’s passport to check they can work in the UK.


When an Employee Leaves

Report this information when an employee leaves or if you close your PAYE scheme. The fields to be filled include:

  • Date of leaving: Include the date the employee left the company.

  • Payment after leaving indicator: Put ‘Yes’ if you pay an employee after you’ve sent an FPS with their leaving date (for example, you’re paying them after giving them a P45).


Workplace Pensions

Report this information when you’re paying a workplace pension or annuity. The fields to be filled include:

  • Occupational pension indicator: Put ‘Yes’ if you make occupational pension payments.

  • Annual amount of occupational pension: Only put this the first time you pay someone from an HMRC-registered workplace pension scheme. Otherwise, leave this field blank (do not enter £0.00).

  • Employee receiving occupational pension because they’re a recently bereaved spouse/civil partner: Put ‘Yes’ if this applies.

  • Trivial commutation payment type: If you’re paying a lump sum — put ‘A’ for a trivial commutation lump sum (TCLS), ‘B’ if it’s from a personal pension scheme, or ‘C’ if it’s from a workplace or public service pension scheme.

  • Trivial commutation payment: The lump sum paid. Also fill in the ‘Taxable pay to date’ and ‘Taxable pay in this period’ fields, and put any non-taxable amount in the ‘Non-tax or National Insurance contribution payment’ field.

  • Payment to a non-individual: Put ‘Yes’ if you make payments to a personal representative, trustee or corporate organisation etc.


End-of-year or Final Reports

You’ll need to complete certain annual reports and tasks to prepare for the next tax year, which starts on 6 April. Report this information in your final FPS or EPS of the tax year. You will also need to fill in the relevant fields if it’s your last report because you’re closing your PAYE scheme. The fields to be filled include:

  • Final submission for year: Put ‘Yes’ to tell HMRC this is your final payroll report of the tax year.

  • Ceased indicator: Put ‘Yes’ if this is the last report because you’re closing your PAYE scheme. Also enter ‘Date scheme ceased’ and the ‘Date of leaving’ for all your employees. Do not fill in ‘Final submission for year’.

  • Date scheme ceased: Include the date the scheme ceased.


After Submitting an FPS

After you have submitted your FPS to HMRC, you can record the expense in your invoicing software by putting the total amount paid in net salaries, income tax, NI employee contributions, and NI employer contributions into the same expense with multiple categories. You can also add extras such as bonuses, commissions, and travel expenses.


In the next tax month (which starts on the 6th), you can view how much tax and National Insurance you owe in your HMRC online account from the 10th. You can claim any reduction on what you’ll owe HMRC (for example statutory pay) by sending an Employer Payment Summary (EPS) by the 19th. You must pay HMRC the balance by the 22nd (or the 19th if paying by post).


In conclusion, submitting an FPS is a crucial part of the payroll process in the UK. By understanding how to prepare and submit an FPS, employers can ensure they meet their payroll reporting obligations and stay compliant with UK tax laws.


The Role of a Tax Accountant in Handling the HMRC FPS


The Role of a Tax Accountant in Handling the HMRC FPS

Navigating the complexities of the UK tax system can be a daunting task for many individuals and businesses. This is where the expertise of a tax accountant becomes invaluable, particularly when dealing with forms such as FPS. Let’s explore how a tax accountant can assist you with the HMRC FPS in the UK.


Understanding the HMRC FPS

The HMRC FPS is a crucial document used by employers to report the pay and tax details of their employees to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). A tax accountant can help you understand the purpose of the FPS, the information it should contain, and when and how it should be submitted. They can also guide you through the process of filling out the form, ensuring that all the necessary details are accurately provided.


Ensuring Compliance with Tax Laws

Tax laws in the UK are complex and constantly evolving. A tax accountant stays up-to-date with these changes and ensures that your business remains compliant. When it comes to the FPS, they can help you understand your obligations as an employer, including the need to complete a FPS for each employee where a P11 deductions working sheet was required during the year. They can also advise you on the deadlines for submitting the form to avoid penalties.


Handling Substitute Forms P14

In some cases, employers might need to use a substitute form P14. A tax accountant can guide you through the process of requesting approval from HMRC to use a substitute form, preparing a specimen of the form, and forwarding it to the appropriate HMRC office for approval.


Dealing with Discrepancies

If there are discrepancies in your FPSs, HMRC may send out one-to-many (OTM) letters advising you to check the figures provided and correct any errors. A tax accountant can help you respond to these letters, investigate potential discrepancies, and work with HMRC to resolve any issues. They can also help you implement systems and processes to prevent such discrepancies in the future.


Providing Expert Advice and Guidance

A tax accountant can provide expert advice and guidance on all aspects of the FPS. They can answer any questions you may have, explain complex concepts in simple terms, and provide practical tips to make the process easier. They can also help you understand the implications of the information provided in the form, such as how it affects your tax liability and the amount of tax you need to withhold from your employees' wages.



In conclusion, a tax accountant plays a crucial role in helping you handle the HMRC FPS in the UK. They can help you understand the form, ensure compliance with tax laws, handle substitute forms, deal with discrepancies, and provide expert advice and guidance. By leveraging their expertise, you can navigate the complexities of the UK tax system with confidence and ease.


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