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How To Pay Corporation Tax in Instalments in the UK?

Updated: Sep 5, 2023

In the United Kingdom, large corporations are required to pay their Corporation Tax electronically and in instalments. The rules for payment differ based on the company's annual profit rate. Here's a comprehensive guide on how large companies pay Corporation Tax in the UK.


How do Large Companies Pay Corporation Tax in Instalments in the UK


Definition of a Large Company

A large company, in terms of Corporation Tax, is one whose profits for the accounting period in question are at an annual rate of more than £1.5 million but less than £20 million. These companies must pay their Corporation Tax electronically by instalments.


Exceptions to the Rule

There are certain exceptions to this rule. A company does not need to pay by instalments for an accounting period if the amount of its total liability for the accounting period is less than £10,000 or its profits for the accounting period are no more than £10 million and it did not exist or did not have an accounting period at any time during the previous 12 months. If either of these conditions apply, the company must pay its tax in full by the normal payment due date.


Accounting Periods and Associated Companies

For accounting periods beginning before 1 April 2015 and beginning on or after 1 April 2023, the £1.5 million and £10 million thresholds are reduced by dividing these by the number of associated companies, plus your company. An associated company is one that is under the control of the other or both are under the control of the same person or persons.


Instalment Payments

For accounting periods of 12 months, Corporation Tax is normally paid in 4 quarterly instalments, 2 of which are due before the end of the accounting period. If the accounting period is less than 12 months, the last instalment will be due 3 months and 14 days after the last day of the accounting period.


Estimating and Adjusting Payments

To work out instalment payments, companies first estimate their Corporation Tax liability for the accounting period. This estimate may change as the accounting period progresses, and companies may need to make 'top-up' payments to cover the shortfall in previous instalments. If a company overpays, it can claim back the overpayment or deduct it from future instalment payments.


Corporation Tax in the UK is paid in instalments, with the specifics of the payment schedule and amount depending on the company's profits and other factors. Here's a detailed guide on the instalment payment process.


Instalment Payment Schedule

For accounting periods of 12 months, Corporation Tax is normally paid in 4 quarterly instalments. If the accounting period is less than 12 months, the last instalment will be due 3 months and 14 days after the last day of the accounting period.


For a 12 month accounting period, the instalments are due as follows:

Payment

Payment Due Date

First payment

6 months and 13 days after the first day of the accounting period

Second payment

3 months after the first instalment

Third payment

3 months after the second instalment (14 days after the last day of the accounting period)

Final payment

3 months and 14 days after the last day of the accounting period


Estimating and Adjusting Payments

To work out instalment payments, companies first estimate their Corporation Tax liability for the accounting period. This estimate may change as the accounting period progresses, and companies may need to make 'top-up' payments to cover the shortfall in previous instalments. If a company overpays, it can claim back the overpayment or deduct it from future instalment payments.


Special Rules for Ring Fence Companies

Companies that are liable to Corporation Tax and supplementary charge on profits from ring fence activities (UK Continental Shelf oil-related activities that under UK law constitute a separate trade) have a different instalment payment schedule. They pay their Corporation Tax and supplementary charge on their ring fence profits in a maximum of 3 equal instalments due:

  1. 6 months and 13 days after the first day of the accounting period

  2. 3 months after the first instalment

  3. 14 days after the last day of the accounting period


Group Payments

Group companies can offset an amount overpaid by one company against an amount unpaid by another company in the group. HMRC also offers Group Payment Arrangements, which allow groups to make instalment payments on a group-wide basis.


Penalties and Repayment Claims

A penalty may be charged if a company deliberately fails to make instalment payments or makes instalment payments that are too small. If a company finds that its Corporation Tax liability will be less than expected, it can make a claim for repayment of some or all of its instalment payments.


In conclusion, the process of paying Corporation Tax in instalments in the UK involves careful estimation of tax liability, timely payments according to the specified schedule, and adjustments as necessary. It's crucial for companies to accurately estimate their tax liability and adjust their payments as necessary to avoid penalties.



Interest and Instalment Payments for Corporation Tax in the UK

Corporation Tax in the UK is typically paid in instalments, and interest can be charged or paid depending on the circumstances. Here's a detailed guide on how interest and instalment payments work for Corporation Tax in the UK.


Interest Charged by HMRC

HMRC charges interest on late or underpaid instalments. This interest, known as 'debit interest', is tax-deductible for Corporation Tax purposes. The interest is only calculated and charged when the company submits its Company Tax Return.


Interest Paid by HMRC

HMRC will pay your company interest if:

  • You make instalment payments that turn out to be unnecessary

  • You pay them early

  • Your payment is too high

The interest paid by HMRC is taxable for Corporation Tax purposes. This interest, known as 'credit interest', is only calculated and charged retrospectively, once the liability for the period is established, normally when you submit your Company Tax Return.


Getting a Refund or Interest on Your Corporation Tax in the UK

In the UK, if your company or organisation pays more Corporation Tax than it owes, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) will repay the overpaid amount and may also pay interest on it. The interest rate set by HMRC is currently 0.5%.


Refunds on Overpaid Corporation Tax

You can use your Company Tax Return to inform HMRC if you believe you're due a Corporation Tax refund, also known as a 'repayment', and specify how you want it paid. If you include your bank details on your Company Tax Return, HMRC will automatically refund the owed amount into your bank account. If you do not include your bank details, HMRC will use the money you're owed to pay other taxes your company owes, such as PAYE or VAT, or your next Corporation Tax bill or a late filing penalty.


Interest on Early or Overpaid Tax

HMRC will pay you interest if you've paid tax early, known as 'credit interest', or paid more than your company owes, known as 'repayment interest'. This interest is taxable and should be included as income in your Company Tax Return.


For early payments, HMRC will usually pay interest from the date you pay your Corporation Tax to the payment deadline. The earliest date they'll pay interest from is 6 months and 13 days after the start of your accounting period.


If you've paid more than you owe, HMRC will usually pay interest on your refund from either when the tax was due or when you paid the tax, if you paid after the due date.


Interest on Instalment Payments

If you pay your Corporation Tax in quarterly instalments, your interest is calculated from the later date of either the first instalment date or the date your balance goes above what you owe. HMRC automatically pays you the interest after they know your final Corporation Tax bill for the accounting period, which is normally when you file your Company Tax Return.


A Real-Life Example of Interest and Instalment Payments for Corporation Tax

Understanding the process of interest and instalment payments for Corporation Tax in the UK can be made easier through real-life examples. Here's a hypothetical scenario that illustrates how a company might handle these aspects of Corporation Tax.


The Scenario

Let's consider a manufacturing company, British Manufacturing Ltd. The company has been trading for several years and has consistently made profits, resulting in a Corporation Tax liability each year.


Estimating Tax Liability and Making Instalment Payments

At the start of the financial year, the company's finance director estimates the company's Corporation Tax liability based on projected profits for the year. The company is classified as 'large' for tax purposes, so it must pay its Corporation Tax in quarterly instalments.


The finance director schedules the instalment payments to ensure they are made on time. The first instalment is paid six months and 13 days after the start of the accounting period, with subsequent instalments paid at three-month intervals.


Adjusting Instalment Payments

Halfway through the financial year, the company secures a major contract that significantly increases its projected profits for the year. As a result, the finance director realises that the company's Corporation Tax liability will be higher than initially estimated.


The finance director adjusts the remaining instalment payments to reflect the increased tax liability. This ensures that the company pays the correct amount of Corporation Tax and avoids interest charges for underpayment.


Interest on Early Payment

Later in the year, the company receives an unexpected cash inflow from the sale of a subsidiary. The finance director decides to use some of this cash to pay the final instalment of Corporation Tax early.


Because the instalment is paid early, the company is entitled to receive interest from HMRC. This interest, known as 'credit interest', is calculated from the date of the early payment to the original payment deadline.


This example illustrates how a company can manage interest and instalment payments for Corporation Tax in the UK. The key points to note are the importance of accurately estimating the company's tax liability, making instalment payments on time, and adjusting these payments if the company's financial circumstances change. Paying instalments early can also result in interest being paid to the company, providing an additional financial benefit.



Working Out Instalment Payments

To work out your instalment payments, you first need to estimate your Corporation Tax liability for the accounting period. This estimate may change as the accounting period progresses, and you may need to make 'top-up' payments to cover the shortfall in your previous instalments. If you've paid too much, you can claim back your overpayment or deduct it from future instalment payments.


For a 12-month accounting period, you pay your total liability in 4 equal instalments. For accounting periods of 3 months or less, you make a single payment of your total liability. For accounting periods longer than 3 months but less than 12, all instalments except the last will be the company’s total liability divided by the number of months in the accounting period, multiplied by 3.


Penalties on Instalment Payments

A penalty may be charged if you deliberately fail to make instalment payments or make instalment payments that are too small.


Repayment Claims

If you find that your Corporation Tax liability will be less than expected, you can make a claim for repayment of some or all of your instalment payments. Claims must be made to an officer of HMRC and must state both the amount that you consider should be repaid and your grounds for believing that, because of a change in circumstances since the payment or payments were made, the amount of your total liability for the period is likely to be less than previously worked out.


In conclusion, understanding how interest and instalment payments work for Corporation Tax in the UK is crucial for companies to manage their tax liabilities effectively. It's important to make accurate estimates of tax liability, make timely payments, and adjust payments as necessary to avoid penalties and interest charges.



Interest on Corporation Tax


Interest Type

When it Applies

Tax Implication

​Debit Interest

Charged on late or underpaid instalments

Tax-deductible

Credit Interest

Paid when instalments are unnecessary, paid early, or too high

Taxable


Instalment Payments for 12-Month Accounting Period


Instalment

Due Date

First

6 months and 13 days after the first day of the accounting period

​Second

3 months after the first instalment

Third

3 months after the second instalment (14 days after the last day of the accounting period)

Final

3 months and 14 days after the last day of the accounting period


Instalment Payments for Accounting Periods Less Than 12 Months


Accounting Period

Payment Due Date

Less than 3 months

Single payment due 3 months and 14 days after the last day of the accounting period

Longer than 3 months but less than 12

First payment due 6 months and 13 days after the first day of the accounting period, other payments due at 3 monthly intervals after then


Penalties on Instalment Payments


Penalty Cause

Penalty

​Failure to make instalment payments

Yes

Making instalment payments that are too small

​Yes


Repayment Claims


Condition

Action

Corporation Tax liability is less than expected

Can make a claim for repayment of some or all of your instalment payments

Sustained significant losses

Can make a repayment claim when your revised liability includes anticipated losses from your current accounting period that has not yet ended


Please note that these tables are a simplified representation of the rules. For a detailed understanding, it's recommended to refer to the official HMRC guidance.


Corporation Tax Penalties in the UK

In the UK, companies are required to meet certain deadlines and requirements related to Corporation Tax. Failure to do so may result in penalties. This article provides an overview of the penalties associated with Corporation Tax in the UK.


Corporation Tax Penalties in the UK



Avoiding Corporation Tax Penalties

HMRC expects companies to take reasonable care over their tax affairs. If a company takes reasonable care but still makes a mistake, HMRC may not charge a penalty or the amount of the penalty may be reduced. Examples of reasonable care include ensuring the accuracy of the Company Tax Return, keeping sufficient records to support the return, and providing HMRC with all the necessary information when asked.


Penalties for Not Notifying HMRC

If a company has Corporation Tax to pay but does not receive a 'Notice to deliver a Company Tax Return' from HMRC, it must still notify HMRC of its liability for Corporation Tax within 12 months of the end of the Corporation Tax accounting period. Failure to do so may result in a 'failure to notify' penalty.


Calculation of Penalties

The penalty is calculated by applying a percentage to the amount of tax that the company owes. The percentage applied depends on whether the error or failure was careless, deliberate, or deliberate and concealed. The maximum penalty depends on the type of failure, but it may be less if the company discloses the error promptly and fully, helps HMRC calculate what's owed, and allows HMRC access to the necessary records.


Here is a table showing the maximum penalty for each type of failure:

Type of Failure

Maximum Penalty Payable

​Non-deliberate

​30% of the potential lost revenue

Deliberate but not concealed

70% of the potential lost revenue

Deliberate and concealed

​100% of the potential lost revenue


Penalties for Late Filing of Company Tax Returns

If a company does not file its Company Tax Return on time, it may be charged a penalty. This penalty may be charged even if the company does not owe any Corporation Tax.


Penalties for Inaccurate Company Tax Returns

The penalty for an inaccurate Company Tax Return is a percentage of the extra tax due when the mistake is corrected. The amount of penalties depends on the type of error and when the company told HMRC about it. The penalty will be less if the company discloses the error before HMRC finds out about it.


Here is a table showing the penalty ranges for unprompted and prompted disclosure:

Type of Error

Penalty Range for Unprompted Disclosure

Penalty Range for Prompted Disclosure

​Careless

0% to 30%

​15% to 30%

​Deliberate but not concealed

20% to 70%

35% to 70%

​Deliberate and concealed

​30% to 100%

​50% to 100%


Penalties on Instalment Payments

If a company's profits for an accounting period are at an annual rate of more than £1.5 million, it must normally pay its Corporation Tax for that period in instalments. HMRC may charge a penalty if the company deliberately fails to make instalment payments, or deliberately makes instalment payments that are too small.


It's crucial for companies to understand the penalties associated with Corporation Tax in the UK and to take reasonable care to avoid these penalties. This includes ensuring the accuracy of the Company Tax Return, notifying HMRC of Corporation Tax liability in a timely manner, and making instalment payments as required.



A Real-Life Example of Corporation Tax Penalties in the UK

Understanding the implications of Corporation Tax penalties in the UK can be made easier through real-life examples. Here's a hypothetical scenario that illustrates how a company might encounter these penalties.


The Scenario

Let's consider a retail company, British Retailers Ltd. The company has been trading for several years and has consistently made profits, resulting in a Corporation Tax liability each year.


Missing the Filing Deadline

In a particularly busy year, the company's finance team overlooks the deadline for filing the Company Tax Return. The return is filed one month late, resulting in an automatic penalty from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). This penalty applies even though the company has paid its Corporation Tax on time.


Underestimating Tax Liability

Later in the same year, the company launches a successful new product line. The increased sales lead to higher profits than anticipated, and the company's actual Corporation Tax liability turns out to be higher than the amount it has paid in instalments.


When the company submits its Company Tax Return, it pays the additional tax due. However, because the instalments were underpaid, HMRC charges interest on the underpaid amount. This interest, known as 'debit interest', is calculated from the original instalment payment dates to the date when the additional tax was paid.


Deliberate Underpayment

In another year, the company's finance director deliberately underestimates the company's tax liability in order to reduce the instalment payments. The director believes that the company can use the cash saved to invest in a new business opportunity, and then pay the additional tax later.


However, HMRC investigates the company's tax affairs and discovers the underpayment. Because the underpayment was deliberate, HMRC charges a penalty. The penalty is a percentage of the potential lost revenue, and the percentage is higher because the underpayment was deliberate.


This example illustrates the potential penalties that a company can face in relation to Corporation Tax in the UK. These penalties can be significant and can apply in a variety of situations, including late filing of the Company Tax Return, underpayment of instalments, and deliberate underpayment of tax.


To avoid these penalties, it's crucial for companies to meet all their tax obligations, including filing the Company Tax Return on time, making accurate estimates of tax liability, and making instalment payments as required. If a company is unsure about any aspect of its tax obligations, it should seek professional advice.


Repayment Claims of Corporation Tax in the UK

Corporation Tax in the UK is a significant obligation for companies. However, there may be instances when a company has overpaid its Corporation Tax and is eligible to make a repayment claim. This article provides an overview of the process and conditions for making repayment claims of Corporation Tax in the UK.


Introduction to Repayment Claims

A company that is liable to pay Corporation Tax under the quarterly instalment payments regulations will usually pay its Corporation Tax liability before it delivers its Company Tax Return. If the amount paid exceeds the final amount shown as due and payable in the company’s self-assessment for that accounting period, then the excess is automatically repayable.


Repayments Before Liability is Finally Established

There may be instances when a company has made quarterly instalment payments and subsequently has grounds for believing that, due to a change in its circumstances, its total liability for the accounting period is likely to be less than previously calculated, and the total amount it has paid is greater than the amount, based on the revised calculation, that has so far become due to pay. In such cases, the company may apply for repayment of the excess.


Conditions for Repayment Claims

The company must specify the amount that it thinks is repayable and the grounds for that belief. Officers should treat such claims on their merits. Officers should allow a claim based on lower anticipated profits of the period for payments that have been made unless dissatisfied with the grounds given by the company.


Claims Based on Anticipated Losses

Claims based on anticipated losses are usually not accepted until the end of the accounting period when the loss has been realised. However, in exceptional circumstances, such as when the expected losses are so great that they are likely to exceed any relevant income in the current period and the amount of taxable profits of the previous period that relate to the repayment claim, officers may consider claims made before the end of the accounting period.


Here is an example of how a claim based on anticipated losses might work:


Scenario

Action

​A company with a year end 31 December paid instalments based on estimated 2022 profits of £40m. During the first 6 months of 2023, the company’s trade collapses to the extent that it suffers trading losses of £95m in that period.

​The company makes a claim for repayment of the 2022 instalments. The claim is based on a revised calculation of the liability that takes into account an expected loss that will be available to carry back of £40m from 2023.

Surrendering a Repayment

There may be a claim under CTA2010/S963 as extended by REG9, to surrender a repayment due to a quarterly instalment payer to another company.

In conclusion, understanding the process and conditions for making repayment claims of Corporation Tax in the UK is crucial for companies to manage their tax liabilities effectively. It's important to make accurate estimates of tax liability, make timely payments, and adjust payments as necessary to avoid penalties and interest charges.


In conclusion, large companies in the UK are required to pay their Corporation Tax in instalments, with the specifics of the payment schedule and amount depending on the company's profits and other factors. It's crucial for companies to accurately estimate their tax liability and adjust their payments as necessary to avoid penalties.


A Real-Life Example of Repayment Claims of Corporation Tax

Understanding the process of repayment claims for Corporation Tax in the UK can be made easier through real-life examples. Here's a hypothetical scenario that illustrates how a company might go about making a repayment claim.


The Scenario

Let's consider a tech startup, Tech Innovators Ltd. The company has been trading for a few years and has been profitable, paying Corporation Tax on its profits. However, in the current financial year, the company has invested heavily in research and development, resulting in significant expenditure and a projected trading loss for the year.


Realising the Potential for a Repayment Claim

Tech Innovators Ltd has been making quarterly instalment payments for Corporation Tax based on the previous year's profits. However, given the projected loss for the current year, the company's finance director realises that the Corporation Tax liability for the year will be significantly less than the amount already paid in instalments.


Making the Repayment Claim

The finance director contacts HMRC to make a repayment claim. In the claim, the director specifies the amount they believe is repayable and provides the grounds for this belief, including financial statements showing the company's expenditure and projected loss for the year.


HMRC's Response

HMRC reviews the claim and the supporting evidence. They agree with the finance director's assessment and decide to refund the overpaid Corporation Tax. The refund is paid directly into the company's bank account, providing a welcome boost to the company's cash flow at a time when it is making significant investments.


The Impact of the Repayment Claim

The successful repayment claim has several benefits for Tech Innovators Ltd. Firstly, it improves the company's cash flow, which is particularly important given the company's current expenditure. Secondly, it provides a valuable lesson for the finance director and the rest of the management team about the importance of accurately estimating the company's tax liability and making appropriate instalment payments. Finally, it demonstrates the value of keeping accurate and up-to-date financial records, which were crucial in supporting the repayment claim.



This example illustrates how a company can make a repayment claim for Corporation Tax in the UK. It's important to note that each company's situation is unique, and the process may not always be straightforward. However, with accurate financial records and a good understanding of the tax rules, companies can ensure that they pay the correct amount of Corporation Tax and make successful repayment claims when necessary.


Can Only Large Companies Pay Corporation Tax in Instalments in the UK

The question of whether only large companies can pay Corporation Tax in installments in the UK is a common one, especially among small business owners who are looking for ways to manage their tax liabilities more effectively. The general perception is that installment options are reserved for large corporations, but that's not entirely accurate.


In the UK, the installment system for Corporation Tax is primarily designed for large companies, defined as those with annual profits exceeding £1.5 million. These companies are required to pay their Corporation Tax in quarterly installments. However, this doesn't mean that smaller businesses are entirely excluded from the option of paying in installments. While it's true that the system is not automatically extended to smaller companies, there are circumstances where they can also take advantage of this payment method.


For instance, if a small business experiences a sudden surge in profits that pushes it into the large company category, it may be required to start paying its Corporation Tax in installments. Conversely, if a large company sees a significant drop in profits, it may revert to paying its tax in a lump sum, like a smaller business. Therefore, the installment system is more about the level of profits than the size of the company.


Additionally, small businesses can voluntarily opt to make advance payments towards their Corporation Tax liabilities, even if they're not required to do so. While this isn't the same as the formal installment system for large companies, it achieves a similar outcome: spreading the tax burden over a period, thereby easing cash flow.


Moreover, the UK tax system is relatively flexible and allows for special arrangements in certain situations. If a small business is facing financial difficulties, it can contact HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to discuss alternative payment arrangements, which could include installments.


While the Corporation Tax installment system in the UK is geared towards large companies, smaller businesses are not strictly barred from paying their taxes in this manner. Depending on their profit levels and individual circumstances, small businesses may also be able to utilize installment payments to manage their Corporation Tax liabilities more effectively.


Why Small Businesses Should Also Consider Paying Corporation Tax in Installments

While the article focuses on large corporations, it's essential to note that small businesses can also benefit from paying Corporation Tax in installments. This approach can help manage cash flow more effectively and avoid the financial strain that a lump sum payment can cause.


The Role of Digital Accounting Software in Managing Corporation Tax

Digital accounting software can be a game-changer when it comes to managing Corporation Tax installments. These platforms often come with features that allow you to set reminders for payment deadlines, calculate your estimated tax liability, and even make direct payments to HMRC. This can significantly reduce the risk of late payments and the penalties associated with them.


Tax Advisors: Your Go-To Experts for Corporation Tax Installments

If you're unsure about how to go about paying your Corporation Tax in installments, consulting a tax advisor can be invaluable. These experts can provide tailored advice based on your company's specific financial situation. They can help you understand the various thresholds and rules that apply to your business, ensuring that you're not only compliant but also optimizing your tax payments.


The Impact of Brexit on Corporation Tax Installments

Brexit has brought about several changes in the UK's tax landscape, and this includes Corporation Tax. Companies trading with EU countries may find that their tax liabilities have changed, affecting the amount they need to pay in installments. Being aware of these changes can help businesses plan their finances better.


Understanding the Penalties for Non-Compliance

The article touches on the penalties for failing to make installment payments, but it's crucial to delve deeper into this topic. Non-compliance can result in hefty fines and even legal action. Understanding the severity of these penalties can serve as a strong motivator to ensure timely and accurate payments.


How COVID-19 Has Affected Corporation Tax Installments

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on businesses, affecting their profits and, consequently, their Corporation Tax liabilities. Some companies may find that their reduced profits mean they no longer fall into the 'large company' category, affecting how they pay their Corporation Tax. It's crucial to re-evaluate your tax position in light of these changes.


The Importance of Accurate Financial Forecasting

One of the key aspects of paying Corporation Tax in installments is the ability to accurately forecast your company's profits. Inaccurate forecasts can lead to over or underpayments, both of which come with their own set of challenges and potential penalties. Utilizing financial forecasting tools can help you make more accurate estimates, making the installment process smoother.


By incorporating these additional topics into your article, you can provide a more comprehensive guide to paying Corporation Tax in installments in the UK. This will not only make your article more informative but also help it rank better for the key phrase "can you pay corporation tax in installments" in the UK Google search.


How a Tax Accountant Can Help You with Corporation Tax Instalment Plan in the UK


How a Tax Accountant Can Help You with Corporation Tax Instalment Plan in the UK

Managing Corporation Tax can be a complex task, especially when it comes to instalment plans. A tax accountant can provide invaluable assistance in this area, ensuring that your company meets its obligations while also taking advantage of any opportunities to minimise its tax liability. This article explores the ways in which a tax accountant can help with Corporation Tax instalment plans in the UK.


Understanding the Basics

A tax accountant can help you understand the basics of Corporation Tax and the instalment payment system. They can explain the criteria for being classified as a 'large' company for tax purposes, the deadlines for instalment payments, and the penalties for late or insufficient payments. This foundational knowledge is crucial for effective tax management.


Estimating Tax Liability

One of the key tasks in managing Corporation Tax instalments is estimating your company's tax liability for the accounting period. This is not always straightforward, as it involves predicting your company's profits for the year. A tax accountant can use their expertise to make accurate estimates, taking into account factors such as your company's past performance, current financial data, and economic forecasts.


Making Instalment Payments

Once your tax liability has been estimated, the next step is to make the instalment payments. A tax accountant can ensure that these payments are made on time and in the correct amount, helping you avoid interest charges and penalties. They can also adjust the payments as necessary if your estimated tax liability changes during the accounting period.


Dealing with Interest and Penalties

If your company pays its Corporation Tax late or underpays, it may be charged interest. Conversely, if it overpays or pays early, it may be entitled to receive interest. A tax accountant can help you navigate these situations, ensuring that you pay any interest due and claim any interest owed. They can also help you avoid or minimise penalties by ensuring that your company meets all its tax obligations.


Making Repayment Claims

If your company has overpaid its Corporation Tax, it may be able to make a repayment claim. This involves providing evidence that your company's tax liability is less than previously estimated and that the instalments paid exceed the amount due. A tax accountant can assist with this process, helping you gather the necessary evidence and submit the claim.


Planning for the Future

A tax accountant can also help with long-term tax planning. They can advise on strategies to minimise your company's tax liability, such as claiming reliefs and allowances, timing expenditure to maximise deductions, and structuring transactions in a tax-efficient manner. They can also help you plan for future instalment payments, ensuring that your company has sufficient cash flow to meet its tax obligations.


Keeping Up with Changes

Tax laws and regulations can change frequently, and it's important to stay up-to-date to ensure compliance and take advantage of any new opportunities to reduce tax liability. A tax accountant can keep track of these changes for you, interpreting complex legislation and providing clear, practical advice.


In conclusion, a tax accountant can provide invaluable assistance with managing Corporation Tax instalment plans in the UK. From understanding the basics to making instalment payments, dealing with interest and penalties, making repayment claims, planning for the future, and keeping up with changes, a tax accountant can help ensure that your company meets its tax obligations and minimises its tax liability.

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